Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Albany Australia
    Posts
    132

    Budget processing with GIMP.

    GIMP is free software which can give you the same results as Photoshop and the like.

    It's been around for a long time now and is very mature. I tried it years ago for a while and it was ok
    but then I got Photoshop through a job I was doing and it was legal so I got used to using it as GIMP
    was less intuitive as they say. With the latest system and hardware the older version of Photoshop
    just doesn't work anymore. It was time to see what was available at my favourite price - nothing.

    The latest version of GIMP still has bits that are a bit odd to me to use but it does a great job and
    has a lot of features that allow it to be a close rival to commercial software. The download is no worries
    and there was no problem installing.

    If you are on a tight budget (or if you are like me - tight) then this is well worth a look.

    The only thing I really had trouble with was remembering what format of file to use. This affects layers
    and the like but as with anything, once you know....

  2. #2
    I was thinking of using it to design wargames. I have a hex sheet fed into it. It looks terribly complicated though. Best I could do is basic colours and then send it off to a professional artist I think.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Albany Australia
    Posts
    132
    If you want me to help I can probably do some for you. The trick is to use layers. You work on one and have the hexes as outlines with the white interior actually transparent.
    The hex layer then shows over the top of the 'picture' underneath. It is complicated at first but like photoshop it allows you to get really good results once you know what
    to do.

  4. #4
    Administrator Whiterook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    2,821
    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan View Post
    I was thinking of using it to design wargames. I have a hex sheet fed into it. It looks terribly complicated though. Best I could do is basic colours and then send it off to a professional artist I think.
    I have been observing how wargame maps are currently designed, by some of the newest games designers out there, as well as the established designers who’ve been doing this for years, and I’d been pleasantly surprised (and pleased) to see that much of it is still old-school artwork, instead of all computer generated. That, to an artist, is exciting to see.

    As an artist, I hold firm and resolute that a skilled illustrator, color pencil artist, watercolor/oil/multimedia artist, etc., can produce stunning work with more adaptability than computer generated. I could be wrong ...but I believe here are more limitations than what can be produced digitally, than with brush/pen/marker/pencil.

    On the flip side, many fine wargames utilize simplistic imagery to fine effect (look at advanced Squad Leader maps, for instance), to which electronic software more than excels. Chances are, there are some image artwork that may be found out there on the great cyber highway, but I also encourage you to look at HexDraw, which is very inexpensive and fairly user friendly.

    Another facet to consider as well is, many wargame companies are coming up with stunning map work, to which I can only assume is primarily digital, but to which they never really speak about. Lock ‘N Load Publishing is coming out with amazing maps, as is Compass Games, Avalanche Press, and Academy Games, just to name a few.
    "There is no off position on the Genius Switch”

  5. #5
    Super Moderator
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Albany Australia
    Posts
    132
    Yes!! Drawing on paper then scanning to a layer is a great way to go rather than trying to draw onscreen every time.

    There is the option of good illustration packages but again a fair learning curve.

    Matching the two can work beautifully but requires the use of layers in Gimp or Photoshop. Layers are you friend at all times
    as they can be used like sheets of plastic. Parts of images can be put on a layer (hex outlines for instance) with the rest
    being transparent so you can see your excellent groundwork underneath. Switching layers off when working on one is the
    trick here and then turning them back on after for the overall view.

    A learning curve for sure but not a big one as getting the hang of it doesn't take long at all.

    An example is a light green layer as the background.
    Next layer is hills (top view like a map).
    Next layer roads / rivers.
    Next layer buildings / towns.
    Next layer other natural features such as trees.
    Next layer hexes or a grid.

    Apart from the background layer they are all transparent where you don't draw anything so they overlay like plastic sheets.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •