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  1. #21
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    I am not really sure exactly what I do, I did not even realise I was reading quicker than some other people until I had it pointed out to me. It does seem that my eyes take in things quicker than my brain can process the information. I also seem to process audible information as written instead of heard, more often than other people. Any way.

    Book 26.

    Sleep Of Death, by Philip Gooden.

    An unusual and very enjoyable book. A young man comes to London to become a Player, or actor as we would call them now. There is a temporary vacancy in the troop that William Shakespear writes for and young Master Nicholas is taken on. He becomes mixed up in a small matter with a theatre goer and as a result is asked to investigate a suspiscious death. Mainly told through the first person it gives a quite unusual view on the Elizabethen stage. I will definitely be looking for the next books.

    https://www.goodreads.com/series/430...pearean-murder
    Always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor never the tormented.

    Elie Wiesel.

    Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor

  2. #22
    Administrator Whiterook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank View Post
    I am not really sure exactly what I do, I did not even realise I was reading quicker than some other people until I had it pointed out to me. It does seem that my eyes take in things quicker than my brain can process the information. I also seem to process audible information as written instead of heard, more often than other people. Any way.
    That’s fascinating actually.... I was always under the impression that people had to learN speed-reading, but then again, it makes perfect sense that it is a natural process for many.

    I’m not OCD, but I would say I can be borderline in some ways. I know some people can read a few paragraphs containing a ‘scene’ of the story, and do so very quickly, taking in the majority of the idea and plot delivered...but I seem to backtrack now and then to make sure I understood what just happened. Weird.

    It’s like with rulebook: They always say, just read though quickly and then play and refer back. My brain doesn’t work that way.

    On the book...I like first person stories, and there is a specific subject area in sci-fi where I love to imagine myself in the characters’ place. “The Stars, Like Dust” (Asimov) was the first book that really did that for me. I should re-read that, someday, but I’d hate to discover I don’t find it as groundbreaking as I did as a teen and spoil the vibe, haha!
    "If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking." - George S. Patton.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whiterook View Post
    That’s fascinating actually.... I was always under the impression that people had to learN speed-reading, but then again, it makes perfect sense that it is a natural process for many.

    I’m not OCD, but I would say I can be borderline in some ways. I know some people can read a few paragraphs containing a ‘scene’ of the story, and do so very quickly, taking in the majority of the idea and plot delivered...but I seem to backtrack now and then to make sure I understood what just happened. Weird.
    It is hard to explain, it is not so much that I speed read or scan things, I just seem to be reading completely normally, just faster than some.

    Book 27.

    Fallen Angels, by Mike Lee.

    I was under the impression that this booka nd the next formed parts 1 and 2 of a story arc. It wasn`t untill I had got a couple of chapters in that I realised I must have 2 and 3 instead. Luckily with these books being set in Games Workshops 40K universe I had a bit of an idea of what had happened already.

    I enjoyed this book, it did probably help that I already was familier with the background as there were quite a few names I would otherwise have had to keep checking on.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...-fallen-angels

    Book 28.

    Angels of Caliban, by Gav Thorpe.

    This book follows on loosely from Fallen Angels and takes me at least into unfamiliar territory with a phase of the Horus Heresy that I had not known about. Again a good book.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...els-of-caliban
    Always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor never the tormented.

    Elie Wiesel.

    Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor

  4. #24
    Administrator Whiterook's Avatar
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    Both sound great, but I take particular interest in the “Fallen Angels” line of books, as I can’s say with any clear collection that I ever read a book, or series of book set within, or based upon an actual game. Sounds rather cool! I did pick up many many years ago, and recently found Team Yankee, so that will be my first in this kind of genre, and will get to see how it matched up to the miniatures game.
    "If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking." - George S. Patton.

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