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  1. #1
    Super Moderator josta59's Avatar
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    Finally becoming a real miniatures wargamer ('bout time, right?)

    Carryover thread from the old forum...

    Until yesterday, my only purchases for a gaming table had been:

    1 grass mat: $8.50 + tax
    1 ready-made house: $17 + tax
    1 ready-made factory: $10 + tax

    All bought since last summer.

    Yesterday I went to Michael's craft store and bought 2x5 Elmer's foam boards, 8x10", at $7.49 per package. Each board will be part of a tile for my modular table. I'll be playing in 10mm or N scale, so these small tiles should work great. I'll put 9 tiles together for a table that will be a bit short of 3' square.

    I also bought a poster board to make roads. I wanted gray or brown but had to settle for black. I might try to paint some of it after I cut it up.

    So the plan is to cut up my grass mat and glue the pieces to the foam boards, then add buildings, roads, and trees. I also have thoughts about making hills on one or two of the tiles.

    I'm hoping to figure out a way to add the buildings and especially the roads in a way that's very impermanent, so that I can easily shift things around for a new layout. The more modular I can make this thing, the better.

  2. #2
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    Good to see someone thinking ahead. Our group uses foam carpet underlay (10mm or 3/8" thick?) as a base for hills etc. Cut 1 foot and six inch squares together with some 1 foot and six inch triangles. Add some three
    inch if you want to. Cut some thin (3") oval and peanut shapes. The squares and be layered with triangles on the edges. This can be topped off with oval shapes and you have a hill. get some T shirt material that will go
    over the whole thing ( a light green colour is good and light tan for desert) with a few inches over the edge. Leave gaps in the underlay and you can have a depression for a river or sunken road. You then have a base system that can be whatever you want and also shows levels for line of sight and so on.

    The T shirt material is long life stuff and sits on the foam really well without moving easily.

    Darker coloured patches of material can be cut in shapes to denote ploughed areas or dense woods (dark green with some trees on it defines an area well. Medium green with trees for sparse woods or orchard).
    The rest of your goodies (buildings, roads) can then go wherever you need them and everything is moveable for the next time.

    Map making is easy too as you know the sizes of the underlay squares so you know where they go before you start.

    These ideas are not mine but they have been ni use by the group for years and we do everything from ancients on.

    The tiles you have bought are excellent for making specific areas to go on the top. Again they remain variable.

    Have a look in the AAR section for our roman and WWII game for a bit of a look. Hope this helps.
    Last edited by MAGNA; 12-12-2017 at 10:42 AM.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator josta59's Avatar
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    Thanks, Magna. I think I need to read this a few times before I can really understand what you mean. I appreciate your suggestions.

  4. #4
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    No worries.

    Hard to picture in your mind though.

    Here is a pic of squares and a triangle for one level of hills or whatever.
    The red oval is the next level up and would show the top of a hill.
    The bottom shows a side view.
    These shapes allow a myriad of landscapes to be made without having a massive amount of
    stock if you like. Less room required and less expense. The T shirt material goes over the top
    of this for a good base.
    Your roads, buildings, trees, miniatures go on next.

    See ? Clear as mud....


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  5. #5
    Super Moderator josta59's Avatar
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    Oh, the pictures help a lot! Thank you, Magna!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by josta59 View Post
    I'll be playing in 10mm or N scale...
    You and I keep gravitating around the same orbit, my friend! I'm planning on investing in 10mm WWII miniatures! I've been doing quite a bit of research, and am looking to do a similar 'modular' diorama system. Take a peak at this.
    If you can't be a good example, be a horrible warning

  7. #7
    Super Moderator josta59's Avatar
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    Hexes would be awesome. I just don't want to make or pay for them. So rectangles it is.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by josta59 View Post
    Hexes would be awesome. I just don't want to make or pay for them. So rectangles it is.
    I think any shape with flat lines would work, as they need to abut one another. I think the benefit of the GHQ method is the use of small hexes, which are 4" side to side. Makes the combination possibilities the game changer (no pun intended).
    If you can't be a good example, be a horrible warning

  9. #9
    Super Moderator josta59's Avatar
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    And here it is, my first wargaming surface! So cheap, and so little effort.

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    It's ready for a Falklands scenario, LOL!

    (There wasn't a lot of cover in the Falklands.)

  10. #10
    Super Moderator josta59's Avatar
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    Just finished a hill section! I spread old playing cards on some paper, then covered that with playdough so I can stick trees into it. Then I glued down some grass mat over all of that.

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    It's tall enough to be an obstacle to 10mm figures, but also flat enough to put models on easily. And vehicles can easily drive over it. Many other hills I've seen don't combine all these qualities, so I'm pretty happy with my work. Especially since it was so cheap and easy to do.

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