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  1. #1
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    Franks 2019 reading thread

    Book 1.

    Under the Wire.
    By William Ash.

    In my wrap up of 2018 I said I had started this and I finished a couple of days into 2019.

    It is the story of an American who goes to Canada to join the RAF, after being shot down he becomes a serial escaper spending a couple of spells in Stalag Luft 3, the Great Escape camp.

    This gives a completely different viewpoint to most of the escape books being written by a working class guy who had grown up durng the depression, not one of the "brylcream boys" that such books are usually about. It was a great read, written with a lot of humour and quite a bit of sadness.

    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...under-the-wire
    Always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor never the tormented.

    Elie Wiesel.

    Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor

  2. #2
    Welcome to the Reading Challenge, mate!

    That one sounds really interesting...might have to check that out!
    If you can't be a good example, be a horrible warning

  3. #3
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    I have got a bit behind with this thread, life has just got in the way, so a few to post about.

    Book 2.
    Gangs of the underhive.

    I got the two new source books for Necromunda for Christmas and read the rule book over the holiday peroid but only got round to this in january. It is all the information needed to field a gang in the game, Necromunda, together with rules for running a campaign. It was surprisingly organised for a gaming book, some great pictures and a good sturdy hardback, not like some of the softback books Games Workshop have bought out recently.

    Books 3 and 4.

    Little Boy Blue, and, Hide and Seek
    by M J Arlidge.

    Books 5 and 6 in this excellent series find Helen being framed for a series of gruesome murders that show an unsettling amount of knowlege about her less than commonplace personal life.

    Slight spoiler here but book 6 finds her in prison with all the dangers that being a police officer entails. Her friend and sergeant is the only person who believes she is innocent, can she find the proof needed while investigating on her own time as her superiors just want it all to go away.

    This is a really good series and I can really recomend it.

    https://www.goodreads.com/series/138119-helen-grace
    Always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor never the tormented.

    Elie Wiesel.

    Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor

  4. #4
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    Book 7.

    Prussian Blue, by Philip Kerr.

    This is the first Kerr I have read and it is quite late in the series, number 12, so I am not sure if I am missing any important background or not, but anyway I really enjoyed it. Bernie Gunther was a German policeman though he is now on the run in this book. Set partly in 1956 Europe he is forced to commit to murdering a spy, a former lover, who is living in the UK now. Things remind him of a case he worked on in 1936 Germany which we visit a lot in flashbacks.

    https://www.fantasticfiction.com/k/philip-kerr/

    I am definitely going to keep an eyeout for the rest of these, hopefully in the right order.
    Always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor never the tormented.

    Elie Wiesel.

    Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor

  5. #5
    Good reads! Yes, life does get in the way....and not always nicely.
    If you can't be a good example, be a horrible warning

  6. #6
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    Book 8.

    Seige, by Geraint Jones.

    Second book in the Blood Forest series, following directly on from Blood Forest. This book sees our hero escaping from the German tribe that had captured him, managing to get to the reletive safety of a border outpost. There might be a clue in the titla about what happens to the outpost.

    Another very good book written in modern language rather than historical by a former soldier so it has a fair amount of bad language and black humour. I am definitely going to be keeping an eye out for the next when it comes out.

    https://www.goodreads.com/author/lis....Geraint_Jones
    Always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor never the tormented.

    Elie Wiesel.

    Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor

  7. #7
    I've read a Kerr book with Bernie Gunter, it was about sex murders in Berlin during WW2. I didn't realize they were a series. Good read as far as I recall. Nebe passed through the book a couple times as Gunter was in the krimanalpolizei. A regular flatfoot and not Gestapo.

  8. #8
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    I have just picked up a couple more Kerrs, one set just after the war and the other in the 50s which have gone on the to-read pile.

    Books 9 and 10.

    Love Like Blood, and The Killing Habit,
    by Mark Billingham.

    These two books see Tom Thorne partner with another Detective Inspector, Nicola Tanner, who has a very different style of policing to him. While having some problems at first they find that they work well together, first investigating the murder of Nicola`s partner .

    https://goodreads.com/series/44061-tom-thorne

    These are great books, I don`t think there has been a bad one in the series sofar.
    Always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor never the tormented.

    Elie Wiesel.

    Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor

  9. #9
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    Book 11.

    The Woman in the Woods, by John Connolly.

    This is book 16 in one of my all time top two book series and it definitely does not disappoint.

    This mix of police drama and supernatural thriller sees Parker with only Louis to help him as Louis`s partner, Angel, is ill, facing up to a really disturbing pair of psycho`s with very weird abilities who are seeking to assemble an old map that will unleash hell on the world. All the while dealing with a racist mobster who Louis has really, really, upset.

    https://www.goodreads.com/series/42499-charlie-parker

    This is one of the best books I have read in quite a while, to misquote Apollo Creed, "some guys write great, but he`s a great writer".
    Always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor never the tormented.

    Elie Wiesel.

    Nobel Laureate and Holocaust survivor

  10. #10
    I'm not a fan of police drama but it's cool that you have a series holding you for 16 book.

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