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  1. #1
    Administrator Whiterook's Avatar
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    Introducing the Warrior Archetype

    Steven Pressfield came across my crosshairs back when I saw the movie, The Legend of Bagger Vance, which is an awesome movie! It wasn’t until much later that I started to learn a little more about Pressfield himself, where I saw commonalities in what he faces as an underdog within the literary world’s endeavors, directly correlating to what I’ve felt in my experiences in everything from fledgling authorship, to game designer, artist...well, let’s just say it struck a nerve in many fronts!

    It wasn’t until recently that I discovered some of his background as a Marine in the 1960’s, and how his Warriors ethos translates to his writing, and speaking (on interviews and YouTUBE. Hers done a wonderful series on the “Introducing the Warrior Archetype”, which I though fit i. Well here at the War Collegeks Lecture Hall.


    A short bio:

    Pressfield was an advertising copywriter, schoolteacher, tractor-trailer driver, bartender, oilfield roustabout, attendant in a mental hospital, fruit-picker in Washington state, and screenwriter.His struggles to make a living as an author, including the period when he was homeless and living out of the back of his car, are detailed in his book The War of Art.


    Pressfield's first book, The Legend of Bagger Vance, was published in 1995, and was made into a 2000 film of the same namedirected by Robert Redford and starring Will Smith, Charlize Theron, and Matt Damon.

    His second novel, Gates of Fire (1998), is about the Spartans and the battle at Thermopylae. It is taught at the U.S. Military Academy, the United States Naval Academy, and the Marine Corps Basic School at Quantico.

    In 2012, Pressfield launched the publishing house Black Irish Books with his agent Shawn Coyne.
    "Life begins at the end of your comfort zone”

  2. #2
    Administrator Whiterook's Avatar
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    Episode 1



    OK, so to be upfront here, I am not sure where this will go over his 50 or so episodes, and what applicability it has on our hobby of wargaming, but I just have a feeling we’ll glean some interesting concepts and trains of thought to make us better as gamers and designers, but also speak to our love of history at the least. Let’s see where the journey takes us!
    "Life begins at the end of your comfort zone”

  3. #3
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    Episode 2, Part I

    "Life begins at the end of your comfort zone”

  4. #4
    Administrator Whiterook's Avatar
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    So in E2/Part I, Pressfield touches on a concept I’ve thought of but, is a real can of worms... the Warrior Culture vs. the Warrior Society.

    When I look at the modern Middle East, and especially when I view the War on Terror, I see combatants such ISIS that base themselves in both... their fighters live in a culture of terrorists as soldiers whom are out to vanquish Western civilization. This of course also translates to everything from Al Queda to Drug Lords in the South American countries, in their individualistic quests against what you and I would define as the civilized world.

    Diving deeper, it’s not only their combatants that live in a warrior culture, where every waking moment is about seizing power, ruling events, guns, bombs, death, and so on; but the wives, mothers and fathers, sons and daughters also live in the constraint, supporting that war against everyone that don’t fall lock step behind their ideals and beliefs. So, for the most part, I’ve viewed them as having both their culture and society in a warrior mindset. Now I’m just talking the combatants and those directly related to them... and of course, I am sure they’re are plenty of examples of family and friends that don’t follow the combatants’ ideals.

    take the opposite side of this crazy coin, and look at the Western societies (e.g., US, UK), where we have military whom live within a closely knit culture, but exist within a greater culture not devoted to the military craft. In fact, the latter can be at direct odds with the former!

    It’s an interesting dynamic.

    I think of the above, when thinking of wargame design... more so in games involving terrorist combatants; and even more so in their countries, and Western troops navigating their lands. When dealing with civilians in your scenarios within these foreign lands, how do they impact play? One game I am in the midst of learning at the moment is Boots on the Ground, which plays United States Army forces against Insurgents in a Middle Eastern setting... could be Iraq, Iran, Afghanistan, etc. It has civilian counters in the mix, and are flipped when encountered... they are either reveals as harmless civilians in the wrong place at the wrong time, or whipping out a gun as insurgents....

    Now think about that in terms of what we were discussing above. Think about that once civilian counter as fitting in the description or warrior society or non-warrior society. Interesting, no?!?
    "Life begins at the end of your comfort zone”

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