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  1. #1
    Administrator Whiterook's Avatar
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    Quilt Batting to make Terrain!

    This is an interesting video, showing how to cover terrain with Low-Loft Quilting Batting! (...yeah, that one kinda surprised me, too.) This is the stuff folks use as the inner batting for quilts, obviously.

    The short story is:
    1. You build up your hill or mountain with hard foam core insulation board ó like the 2Ē or 4Ē thick sheet-type, cut into blocks. Cut and carve the foam blocks to accommodate a final-rough shape on rolling hills.
    2. Cover the resultant hill or mountain with the quilting batting and cut it so that it lies over the terrain shape, so as to get a good fit with minimal to no overhang.
    3. You then use a glue like Mod Podge or Elmerís Whit Glue, and paint it down with a disposable foam house painting brush (those ones that have a square or rectangular brush head on a peg).
    4. Lay the batting, cut to shape, upon the foam core blocks and press it in to form your smooth, rolling terrain., shaping the terrain.
    5. Then, paint it with multiple layers of brown latent house paint.
    6. Finally, add diorama terrain cover.




    Iím not sure Iíd use it a lot, as I prefer a heavily wooded and forested terrain, and this appears bes suited to an arid terrain... but itís fast-ish and looks great!
    "Life begins at the end of your comfort zoneĒ

  2. #2
    Member madman's Avatar
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    I remember back in the day the cool builders used uprights of about 1" square wood to create "high points". Then cover that with chicken wire, pushing and shoving to suit. Cover that with paper mache, strips or sheets of newspaper soaked in glue and/or plaster. After it dries, add more plaster and/or newspaper torn in thinner strips to fill any gaps. The make sure you have a continuous layer of plaster and add as needed. When dried continue as above. Seems a whole lot cheaper than all these new fangled ideas. I know I am out of date but this sounds like nothing more than a way to pay more for your scenery.

  3. #3
    Administrator Whiterook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by madman View Post
    I remember back in the day the cool builders used uprights of about 1" square wood to create "high points". Then cover that with chicken wire, pushing and shoving to suit. Cover that with paper mache, strips or sheets of newspaper soaked in glue and/or plaster. After it dries, add more plaster and/or newspaper torn in thinner strips to fill any gaps. The make sure you have a continuous layer of plaster and add as needed. When dried continue as above. Seems a whole lot cheaper than all these new fangled ideas. I know I am out of date but this sounds like nothing more than a way to pay more for your scenery.
    I hear what you’re saying, and it is indeed an original method still used today, from my readings. However, May layout designers are looking for two things today: less weight; and less cracking of plaster by moving layouts, or inadvertent pressure leaning on the layout surface.

    I found this one interesting because, I have a simple 4” thick foam core board surface foundation, on which I am going to build scenery up. There is no plywood, particularly board, brown board, etc., underlay support... the foam just sits on a camp table. Others use saw horses, or even small modules abutted against one another in a kitchen table or floor. What I am saying is, many layouts are NOT permanent, and many are also portable. They need to be light weight.

    As to cost... well, batting probably costs about as much or less than a box of plaster, and foam scraps are either cheap or free, vs chicken wire. It’s also cleaner than working with wet plaster or plaster sheets.

    Now, I’d mentioned, I probably wouldn’t use this method myself, mainly because of 1. There are going to be air pockets, elsewise if you blue the battling int9 all the nooks, your going to have some stark angles; and 2. after painting, the material is a bit hairy-looking and more textured to a desert landscape look to me. But I can see where many would love this quick and easy-ish solution.
    "Life begins at the end of your comfort zoneĒ

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